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Some thoughts of your typical data shepard / data groomer / data dance teacher sort of person.


SQL Grillen 2018
SQL Grillen 2018

This post is just some reflections on my experience on speaking, as part of the newcomer track at SQL Grillen 2018

Pre SQL Grillen

This is the first part of this post is written on Tuesday 19th June 2018 only 3 days to go before the session. My current feelings are rather to say the least nervous.  Added to that is a considerable feeling of imposter syndrome.  At this time my thoughts and feelings are these -:

Rehearsals - without a doubt, going over the presentation multiple times has helped so much more than anticipated.  Whilst at this point the words that are going to be used have been repeated many times.  They are in my mind.  As each slide comes up, there is little doubt in my mind what I'm going to say or how. 

Less is more - the amount of material that came out of my research into the topic, not all of it has made it into the presentation.  So, what made it in is just what is required to get my point across.  Which has upsides and downsides.  It should make the session better, more focused, and if people ask questions after the session then other examples and illustrations will spring to mind.  On the downside there is part of me that feels like my audience is not getting all that I want to get across.  Then again there are only 60 mins which is more than enough for most people. 

Imposter Syndrome - not sure what can be said about this.  It seems natural, there are many presenters who feel the same.  Right now, the best strategy seems to be to focus on the presentation.  The goal of the presentation to help one person take one thing away from the session.  Who that person is at this moment I do not know.  So if just one person takes one thing away that I will count as a win.   That person might just be me, which is also good.

Mentor - SQL Grillen, did an awesome job with the new comer's track.  Assigning each person, a mentor, for me, I was very luck and have been assigned Cathrine Wilhelmsen as my mentor.  Her insights and attention to detail was invaluable in so many ways.  Cathrine made excellent suggestions and helped me to see the presentation from the point of view of a non-native English speaker's.  Most importantly just generally very encouraging :->

Post SQL Grillen

Phew! OMG! That was soooo scary! Can I try that again? 

Back in Sunny Glasgow.  Now looking to see what lessons I can learn, and other thoughts spring into my mind. 

Bunny in the headlights - It's easy to forget that as a speaker that I felt front and centre.  That is to say, everyone can see you and knows you're a speaker, thats how I saw it.  Even better or worse, each of the new speakers was given an orange apron to wear.  The other speakers had different colours.  For me, it was a strange feeling not in a bad way, more that I am usually part of the audience.  On reflection its not a bad thing, all part of the learning experience. 

Rehearsals – This really worked for me I was able to sit at the speaker's table check my equipment worked, run over my presentation quickly and that was me ready to go.  Doing so many rehearsals (and not having any demos) meant for me that I knew what I was going to say and all the notes I needed were on the slide deck.  Sitting at the speaker's desk was scary, with so many people who I have seen speak before.  At least I was able to make it to a session before I was due to present.  Which allowed me to relax and listen to the awesome trio of Rob Sewell (@sqldbawithbeard), Chrissy LeMaire (@cl) and Cláudio Silva (@ClaudioESSilva) talk about the new dbaChecks module

The Presentation - nervous? YES!  Waiting for the session to start was the worst part.  Having seen some advice from Brent Ozar I had some music playing (that only I could hear) only thing was I had to resist dancing around.  Knowing the presentation allowed me to concentrate on other things.  

Audience – making sure I spoke to the whole audience front row to back, both sides, making eye contact with everyone, looking at their body language, to see if my points hit home 

Pace - at some points my pace was a little faster than should be, I felt able to vary according to the material and audience reactions.  

Body language - both my own to ensure I got points across.  More importantly the body language of the audience.  Was the audience looking at the slide, or looking at me, did they react how I expected?

The Audience - Think about this afterwards, there were so many more people than I would have even dared hoped for.  My guess was about 30 people, some of the people I recognized, my colleagues from Scotland, Craig Porteous, Paul Broadwith, and of course Cathrine :->, and Grant Fritchey aka "The Scary Dba" (yes really!).  Somethings seemed to work really well, like the acronyms game, and my alternative job description, yes you had to be there to get the point. 

Feedback - for me this was the hardest part.  The best that I had expected something like "Meh".

What I did not expect was people saying how well I had done.  Grant Fritchey who attended my session, congratulated me on my presentation, even tweeting about as well.  Then Alexander Arvidsson also congratulated me on the presentation, his kind and encouraging words can be found in this blog post.  Catherine was very generous with her compliments  and encouraged me to review the feedback, which was complimentary and insightful.

Improvements

Finishing - needs more rehearsing, so that the presentation finishes on more of a high, at least from my point of view. 

Timing – instead of using a stopwatch, I used a countdown timer.  At several points, I was trying to see how much time had elapsed.  As my notes had time elapsed at key points.  The countdown timer did not make it easier for me to see the time elapsed.

Hard work – Over the years I have been fortunate enough to see many people speak who make it look so easy.  Having done it now, its like a swan look they look graceful and elegant as it glides across the water's surface.  Yet hidden away underneath the water are the webbed feet working really hard all the time.  That’s my experience of presenting, making it look easy requires a lot of hard work, which remains unseen, the way is should be.

Last point is to thank the SQL Grillen team.  William Durkin, who does an amazing job of making everyone feel welcome.  Ben Weissman for creating and picking the speakers for the newcomers track.  There are as l know so many more in the SQL Grillen team, thank you to all.

Next

There are some ideas which are being considered.  Where, when and what who knows, watch this space.


Why go to SQL Bits?
On the face of it going to a conference looks expensive.  So why should you commit the time and effort to go?  That's a good question.  Do you know everything you need to know to do your job?

a) if not then going to SQLBits is the ideal opportunity to learn more, make yourself a better ( insert your job tile here ) assuming you want to be?

b) if you do then why are you not speaking at SQL Bits?  Knowledge matures, develops and then fruits as it is shared.

Stand on the shoulders of giants
At the conference there is a wide variety of subjects covered these range from technical deep dives, to the geekest technical humour you could ever ask for.  All the way over to advice on leadership, and managing your career .  You also get learn from other peoples hard won wisdom and experience, which has been won over thousands of person hours.   The speakers are delighted and eager to share their experience and save you the hours of effort it to gain the knowledge they have.  Writing this post after SQL Bits XXII l feel that l gained more practical knowledge in 4 days than l did in the previous 12 months.  That alone is what l call value for money. 

Continuing Professional Development 
Having worked with a number architects (they that design building) companies l have been made aware of the concept of Continuing Professional Development. In that any qualified architect is expected to learn and refine their skills for as long as they are a practising architect.

Sponsors
Another big part of the conference is the sponsors, they have stands set up in the main part of the conference.  Yes they are their to sell their products, on the other hand they are very generous and have many have prizes to give away.  Entering the competitions to win prizes can be as simple as giving your email address, others you might have to work for.  Such playing a racing car or sail boat simulator, these are geeks what do you expect !  Some of the sponsors have technical evangelists who are there to speak all of whom in my opinion are worth going to just for their sessions alone.   Next how often do you get to meet with representatives from Microsoft and ask them questions face to face.?

Fun and Games
There's even more fun to be had.  So far l have only attended two SQL Bit conferences.  The evening parties are well something to be experienced, the best way to put it is that these are dreamed up by geeks and attended by geeks.  Both of these groups of people know how to have a good time.  Also if you visit the sponsors you might just come away with tokens, for free drink, at the parties.  Need l say more?

The last question that occurs to me is why do l go?  Personally and ultimately l want to be the best possible person doing my job.  To provide my customers with the best possible service l can offer.  To achieve that will take time, energy, and sacrifices.  Part of that will be paying my way these conferences till l can convince my manager to pay for at least part of them.  Until then l will go to learn and develop, then one day return and speak myself to starting paying back my technical debt.