(scottish) sql bob blog

rss

Some thoughts of your typical data shepard / data groomer / data dance teacher sort of person.


Speaking the same language

We all communicate with each other, some more than most, in our house if my partner is not talking to me there is something wrong.  It's not usual for the misunderstanding to be something I might have said (or done).  Communicating with each other verbally is something that we learn to do from an early age.  We learn what words mean, their power, what they can do for us, what to say, and what not to say.


There have been times I have had the pleasure of going to the local garage and speaking to the mechanic regarding whatever challenge is with the car.  The mechanic would explain the issue to me, using words which I have to say that wished I understood. It is entirely possible that there is a "big end" in our car just do not ask me where it is or what it does.  Or that the timing belt is very important to make the engine run properly.


Every industry, profession, hobby, has their own language.  This often makes it easy for professionals to communicate with each other often in a form of shorthand which can sound foreign to someone else even if they speak the same language.  Working in the IT industry this is something I am very aware of.  If someone asks me what I do for a job what do I say?  I might say that I am a BI professional, working primarily with the MS SQL server stack, sometimes using SSIS, and SSRS.  I write a variety of CRUD scripts in TSQL and I do some query optimisation.  If the person asking is not an IT professional who works in my specific area of expertise, most of my explanation would have sounded like I had spoken in a different language.

What I now say is my job involves three things, data shepherding, data grooming, and data dressage.  I might expand a little on these to explain that l move data from one place to another ensuring none of the data gets lost as we move it.  Some of the data might need to be polished or groomed to fit in its new home.  Then I train data to perform and dance in a way that others can understand it better.  What I try to do is use words which people who are do not work with databases can understand and relate to.


When I speak to clients one thing I try to remember is to use words that anyone can understand.  If I introduce technical concepts or acronyms in the conversation I will try to make time to explain them.  Or use analogies that are simple and easy to understand.  This is not an easy thing to do, it is our job to make IT simple and easy to use.  There might be lots of complicated moving parts behind the scenes.  Like a car, we have a simple dashboard, underneath are lots of complicated moving parts that just work.  The hard work of maintaining and fixing those parts I happily leave to the experts.


Personally, I see our job is to make our customers task as simple as it can be.  We should present challenges, technical details in a language our customers can easily understand.  As Einstein is quoted as saying “make everything as simple as possible but no simpler”.  One excellent example of this is by Brent Ozar when explaining implications of RTO & RPO here -> https://www.brentozar.com/archive/2014/05/new-high-availability-planning-worksheet/.  The worksheet sets out the terms in language everyone can understand, even better by drawing attention to the targets, so everyone knows what to expect.

Is this easy, or simple?  No, it is not.  Having said that which expert do you feel most comfortable with? would happily go back to time and again?  The one that speaks to you in words and terms you can easily understand.  Or one that uses language and words that are sometimes not easy to follow or understand?  The choice for me is easy and simple, which is why I work that little bit hard to make it as easy as possible for my customers to understand me.