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Some thoughts of your typical data shepard / data groomer / data dance teacher sort of person.


M (formally know as Power Query Formula Language), PowerBI and parameterising data sources - part two

In the previous post (see here) l set up the blank datasets as parameters storing the values of the database server and name.  Whilst attempting to create a suitable dataset to a report for an internal customer, l was frustrated that l could not do it using Power Query.  Yet on the other hand l know that l could write some TSQL that would give me the dataset l wanted very easily.  So l wondered if this was possible to combine the two?

So lets return to the SQL.Database function which has this very nice example
Sql.Database("localhost", "Northwind", [Query= select * from Customers]) The last setting is "Query as text - Provide a query text that is run on the server to return values". It's almost like someone thought it would be a good idea to allow a user to run a SQL query. A few minutes later l had the query l wanted to run and it looked something like this -:

DECLARE @IssueType AS VARCHAR(10) = 'Problem'; DECLARE @ClientName AS NVARCHAR(100) = 'RainbowPainters';
SELECT  DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Number        ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Name        ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]) AS Year_Name        ,COUNT(DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])) AS Total FROM    [dbo].[IssueData] AS ID WHERE   [Issue_type_name] = @IssueType         AND [ClientName] = @ClientName GROUP BY DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])        ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created])        ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]);
Next when back to the dataset opened the 'Advanced Editor' and added the query, you can it in Figure 1 below

Figure 1 - Advanced Editor window with the new query in place

To make it a bit easier to read below is the actual text from the 'Advanced Editor' window above.  All that has been added is the text in red,and the query text which is in italics
let

Source = Sql.Database(DatabaseServer, DatabaseName
,[Query = "DECLARE @IssueType AS VARCHAR(10) = 'Problem'; DECLARE @ClientName AS NVARCHAR(100) = 'RainbowPainters'; SELECT  DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Number        ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Name        ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]) AS Year_Name        ,COUNT(DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])) AS Total FROM    [dbo].[IssueData] AS ID WHERE   [Issue_type_name] = @IssueType         AND [ClientName] = @ClientName GROUP BY DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])        ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created])        ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]);" ]) in     Source

When l refreshed the dataset, the data appeared :-)  Job done?  No, as often happens one client gets something and then everybody wants why they have.  So l was asked if we could create the same set of reports for another customer.  There was two choices at this point, l could just change the hard code client name, or could l parameterise the client name.  Having heard this before l knew about passing parameters from excel to filter datasets see the following posts.

https://blog.oraylis.de/2013/05/using-dynamic-parameter-values-in-power-query-queries/
http://blog.crossjoin.co.uk/2015/11/24/using-parameter-tables-to-control-data-refresh-in-power-bi/

Having looked at the blog posts which declare and then used parameters this looked like a simple concept. Kudos to the Power BI team for that.  First step was to add additional dataset as a parameter.   So l now had three dataset as parameters, the latest one being 'ClientName', which stores the client name


Figure 2 - List of datasets containing parameters

So having looked at the blog posts above l realised that l just need to declare a query which would hold the query text and pass in the Client Name parameter to the query text.  Following some trial and error, l ended up with the query text below

let
pQuery =
"DECLARE @IssueType AS VARCHAR(10) = 'Problem';
DECLARE @ClientName AS NVARCHAR(100) = '" & ClientName & "';
SELECT  DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Number
       ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created]) AS Month_Name
       ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]) AS Year_Name
       ,COUNT(DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])) AS Total
FROM    [dbo].[IssueData] AS ID
WHERE   [Issue_type_name] = @IssueType
        AND [ClientName] = @ClientName
GROUP BY DATEPART(MONTH, [Issue_Created])
        ,DATENAME(MONTH, [Issue_Created])
        ,DATENAME(YEAR, [Issue_Created]);",
    Source = Sql.Database(DatabaseServer, DatabaseName,[Query=pQuery])

in

    Source


Figure 3 - showing the query text in the Advanced Editor Window

Much to my delight this syntax works as expected.  So l can now have a way that it is possible to specific parameters which can be passed to SQL server.  From reading about M (Power Query Formula Language) there's more to learn. For the moment l am happy with the new found knowledge, whilst l play with some of the other technologies offered by PowerBI.

The only downside is this only works in PowerBI Desktop :-( 


M (formally know as Power Query Formula Language), PowerBI and parameterising data sources - part one

One of the attractions of being a programmer was that l could find ways to make routine tasks easier and quicker.  As our company and clients have discovered the joy of Power BI also the reports l have created.  There are more clients are asking for reports.  Some of these are the same reports to ensure everyone has the same view of their data.

Scenario
There are two databases l populate with data, one of these is on my machine, the other is an Azure database.  As you would expect l use the local copy to test out various changes to the database.  Then using the Redgate tool SQL Compare l can script any changes and apply them to the Azure database.  It is possible to change the data source for each dataset easily using the following method.

From the main window, on the 'Home' tab click once on the 'Edit Queries' button see Figure 1



Figure 1 - showing the location of the 'Edit Queries' button

This will open the 'Edit Queries' window now to see where the data source for a selected dataset.  First select a dataset in the example shown in Figure 2, it is 'DimDate'.  Next click on the 'Advanced Editor' button see figure 2.


Figure 2 - Showing location of 'Advanced Editor' button

When the Advanced Editor window opens it will look something like the one shown in Figure 3 below.



Figure 3 - Advanced Editor window, with M (Power Query Formula Language) query showing the Database Server Name and Database Name

The syntax of the statement is relatively simple.  In this case we are looking at the Sql.Database data function, the syntax is simple and looks like this -:

Source = Sql.Database( "Name of Database Server", "Name Of Database")

This is the text shown in Figure 3

let
    Source = Sql.Database("localhost", "DBdata"),
    dbo_DimDate = Source{[Schema="dbo",Item="DimDate"]}[Data]
in
    dbo_DimDate

To change the data source to point at the Azure database the only changes that have to made are as follows

let
    Source = Sql.Database("AzureDatabase""DBdata"),
    dbo_DimDate = Source{[Schema="dbo",Item="DimDate"]}[Data]
in
    dbo_DimDate


Job done.  This was nice until you have to do it several times, and personally I got bored then wondered if there was a better way?  I am glad you asked if there is a better way let me show you.

Having seen some examples where the data source was an excel spreadsheet l was aware that it was possible to supply parameters to change the data source.  From one spreadsheet to another one.  
The first step is to set up the parameters.  Open the Query Editor window, click on the 'New Sources' button from the list click on 'Blank Query' (see Figure 4)


Figure 4 - Creating a new blank query

Figure 5 shows what the Query window will look like when it first opens.  Change the name of the query to 'DatabaseServer' then enter the name of the database serving into the text box.  Once you have entered the database server name, click once on the tick to save your changes.


Figure 5 - Show where to make changes to the new query that will store the connect parameter.

Having set up the DatabaseServer dataset (parameter value), repeat the process and create a DatabaseName dataset (parameter value).  Figure 6 shows what you query editor window would look like if you entered the same details shown in this example.


Figure 6 - Showing the two datasets in place containing the parameters, showing the completed 'DatabaseServer' dataset.

So you should now have two additional datasets -:

  * DatabaseServer - containing the value 'AzureDatabase' or the name of the database server you are going to connect to.
  * DatabaseName - containing the value 'DBData' or the name of the database you are going to connect to.

If we look at the advanced properties of the dataset 'DimDate' the data source would look like the one shown below.

let
    Source = Sql.Database("AzureDatabase""DBdata"),
    dbo_DimDate = Source{[Schema="dbo",Item="DimDate"]}[Data]
in
    dbo_DimDate


Next step is to replace the database server name and database name with the names of the Datasets that have just been set up.  So the data source will look like the one below.

 let
    Source = Sql.Database(DatabaseServer, DatabaseName),
    dbo_DimDate = Source{[Schema="dbo",Item="DimDate"]}[Data]
in
    dbo_DimDate

The advanced query window should look like the one show in figure 7 below.  When the data source is queried the values of 'DatabaseServer' and 'DatabaseName' are replaced by the values from the relevant dataset.  In this PowerBI desktop report l just replaced all the hard coded instances of the database server name and database name with the relevant parameter.  Which allows me to switch between two databases with the ease l wanted, only with PowerBI desktop :-(


Figure 7 - Showing the final M (Power Query Formula Language) text (data source)

If you click on this link you can download a copy of a .PBIX with the two dataset's shown above.  

There is more you can do with this you will need to wait till part two of this blog post for more details.


Power BI online user credentials and multiple accounts
Whilst "publishing" some reports for some of our customers from PowerBI desktop to PowerBI online. I made the assumption that the data credentials used in PowerBI desktop would be the same ones used in PowerBI online.

Scenario 
We wanted to share PowerBI reports with some of our customers. It is not possible currently to allow anyone from outwith our Azure AD group to securely access the PowerBI reports. So the only other solution was to get our Office 365 Admin to create an account for each customer. All the customers will connect to the same database to extract their data. On the database an account was created for each customer, so when they connected to the database the customers account could only access that customers data.

First step - Find credentials in PowerBI Desktop 

Open PowerBI desktop at the top left hand side click once with left hand mouse button the menu icon .  The from the menu that appears, go to 'Options and settings' menu item and click once with left hand mouse button (see figure 1)

 
Figure 1 - Showing the 'Options and settings' menu item. 
 
In the 'Data Source Settings' window select the data source (3), that is to say where the data is extracted from. Next press the 'Edit' button (4) this will open the window shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 - First data source settings window.

In the second  'Data Source Settings' window click on the 'Edit' button 


Figure 3 - Second data source settings window

Now you can get the details eg Username and password used to connect to the data source are stored. If these are required. 
 
Figure 4 - Data source credentials window
 
So we now have the follow credentials
Username = [email protected] 
Password = JoeB123 
N.B. We will be using these details later. 

Tip if using multiple accounts with PowerBI online  
Next step would be to publish your reports to the PowerBI service at PowerBI.com.   If you have multiple accounts which you use to publish your reports to a PowerBI service. Then one tip is log out of the account and log back in as there is nothing in the PowerBI desktop application which indicates which account is logged in. 

Adding credentials in PowerBI Service (Aka PowerBi.com) 
One quick tip here is to open PowerBi.com using Internet Explorer. At the time of writing process shown next did not reliability render in other browsers.  Log into PowerBI.com once successfully log in, go to the top right hand side of the window. Click with left hand mouse button the settings icon, from the menu click on the 'Settings' menu item. 

 
Once the 'Settings' window opens click on the 'Datasets' tab 

 

 Once in 'Settings->Datasets' click once with left hand mouse button on the triangle to the left of 'Data source credentials' 



 Once the 'Data source credentials' have been expanded click on the 'Edit credential' link. 

 

 Once the  credentials configuration window opens the drop down box below the authentication method select the 'Basic' authentication method. 

 

 When you select the 'Basic' Authentication method, text boxes will appear at the bottom of the form. Enter the username and password, then click on the 'Sign In' button. 



 If the user name and password has been successful then you will see a message appear in the top right hand corner of the PowerBi window, indicating the data source has been successfully updated.